ourWindsor: A royal baby shower fit for a prince…or princess

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and his wife Kate (PRINCE OF WALES)

Jonathon Liedtke – ourWindsor.ca – July 18, 2013


As the clock counts down to the upcoming Royal Birth of the baby of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and his wife Kate, here in Windsor, celebrations are underway to honour and mark the event.

Cyril Bagin, a self-professed monarchist and a member of the Monarchist League of Canada, took it upon himself to organize a Royal Baby Shower to commemorate the notable birth.

“I’m excited,” expressed Bagin. “For me, the Royal Family isn’t about celebrity, it’s about our history, it’s part of our identity as Canadians and it’s part of our country and our heritage in an ongoing way.”

The birth of the child will profoundly impact Canada as a whole as it will be third in line to the throne.

“Their Excellencies are anxious to learn about the baby’s arrival,” said Marie-Ève Létourneau, the Media Relations Officer for the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General.

“It’s historic for a number of reasons … this is the [direct descendant] of Queen Victoria, the Mother of Confederation, so there’s that significance reminding us of our roots and where we came from,” said Bagin. “In about a generation, this child will likely be the Canadian Monarch.”

The Royal Baby Shower, which takes place at Café Cache on July 28, will allow participants to drop off congratulation cards which will be sent to the Royal Family, but will not accept gifts or donations to the Royal Family. Rather, Bagin has suggested that participants donate to local charities that help children in need. 

“I don’t think the Royal Baby will be in need of any such gifts [and] The Royal Family itself doesn’t encourage gifts,” explained Bagin. “People seem to think that because [they are Royal] that we pay the Royal Family for the things that they do. In reality, we never give them a dime. They’re never paid for anything that they do for Canada, and most people don’t realize how much they do.

Bagin was motivated to plan the event after hearing that other Canadian cities were celebrating in such a way.

“A Royal birth like this reminds us both of our heritage, of where we come from and our roots, but it also reminds us of where we’re going and pointing us with hope towards the future,” said Bagin. “Using the widespread celebration of this one baby’s birth … and to use these celebrations to do something positive, to help these other children who’re being born who are in need [is the intention of the event].”

Faiza Mirza is an international student studying at the University of Windsor, and she is impartial about the impending Royal Birth.

“It’s all for good cause, so I don’t see why it should be a problem or why people shouldn’t be happy about it,” said Mirza. “Personally, I don’t like the hype around it, it seems like it’s too much.”

“I come from a  country which has a colonial past, so I’m not a fan of Monarchies, but it works for some countries and it doesn’t work for others,” said Mirza who added that she did like the attitude of Canadians towards the Queen and Monarchy.

“They’re very open to it, other countries are not … there is a certain sense of pride [in Canada],” said Mirza. “I don’t understand that, but it’s not something to worry about [or] is wrong in any way.”

Bagin noted that the Royal Baby Shower is an appropriate way to celebrate the Royal Birth locally because it “[helps] local children in need and [supports]local charities which are doing good work.”


Jon Liedtke

A royal baby shower fit for a prince…or princess


Jonathon Liedtke is the Features & Opinion Editor for the University of Windsor Lance Campus/Community Newspaper and a reporter for ourWindsor.ca. As a founding member and current Co-Chair of the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Committee, he is committed to representing, connecting, engaging with and advocating for local youth. He is also a member of Windsor’s “Punk with Horns” band The Nefidovs, and as such, is committed to enhancing and sustaining the arts community.